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The vending industry between regulation and economic trends since 1993

The vending industry is currently facing a variety of challenges. Rising operating costs, the decline in floor space in the hospitality industry, the COVID-19 pandemic, and increasing digital competition are putting providers of slot machines under increasing pressure. At the same time, there is only limited legal room for manoeuvre for the vending machine industry to counteract the changed economic conditions by adjusting prices, the quantity offered and via changes to product characteristics.

On behalf of the Verband der Deutschen Automatenindustrie e.V. (Association of the German Amusement Machine Industry), DIW Econ examines the key economic figures of the amusement machine industry against the background of the applicable regulations and the development of economic trends over the past 30 years.

Targeted, Ecological and Social? Evaluation of energy policy relief measures

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Russia’s war of aggression on Ukraine, renewed curfews in China, and the consequences of these events on global supply chains, the inflation rate has reached historic levels in reunified Germany since the beginning of the year. The German government has already adopted two comprehensive measures to cushion the impact of rising prices for energy, food and mobility. However, given the increasing uncertainty in the energy supply and continuing high inflation rates, these do not seem to be enough.

Social welfare associations, in particular, have criticized that the relief measures have so far not considered lower income groups and pensioners sufficiently. At the same time, climate experts fear that individual interventions such as the fuel rebate will create false incentives in the fight against climate change.

Against this background, DIW Econ, together with Prof. Dr Claudia Kemfert, on behalf of the Climate Alliance Germany, has evaluated the existing relief measures and provides an outlook on how ecological and distributional effects can be considered together in a new relief package. This is done based on an analysis of five measures in the areas of energy & heat, transport & mobility and food, which are currently being discussed politically and in the media in anticipation of a further relief package.

G7 Gas Reduction Plan

The recent geopolitical developments have again shown how geographic concentration of fossil fuel production creates global dependencies and affects economies worldwide. Among the G7 countries, the European states are the most dependent on fossil gas supplies from Russia.

DIW Econ’s recent study “G7 Gas Reduction Plan”, commissioned by Greenpeace, on the occasion of the G7 Summit under the German Council Presidency, presents potential climate-neutral technology options implemented by coordinated multilateral action of the G7 states until 2025 to support a reduction of fossil gas demand in the G7 states. The analysis focuses on carbon-neutral options without substituting gas with other fossil fuels or biofuels or significantly reducing industrial production.

Supporting Green Economy in Kazakhstan and Central Asia for low carbon economic development – TIMES, CGE, SD –

During the Winter 2021 semi-annual Energy Systems Analysis Program (ETSAP) Meeting on 29th – 30th November 2021, DIW Econ presented a novel approach to integrate three different models – energy system TIMES model, macroeconomic CGE model and sectoral system dynamics (SD) model –into a hybrid integrated assessment model to support the elaboration of a long-term low-emission development strategy (LEDS) for Kazakhstan.

Decarbonisation measures beyond a CO2 price

The discourse on climate policy to achieve internationally agreed climate targets in Germany is often narrowed down to the instrument of CO2 pricing. A price for the emission of climate-damaging carbon dioxide is an essential building block for achieving the long-term decarbonisation of all sectors.

However, the current study by DIW Econ with Prof. Dr Claudia Kemfert, Head of the Department of Energy, Transport and Environment at DIW, commissioned by Greenpeace, shows that a price on CO2 by itself is by far not sufficient to achieve Germany’s agreed climate goals. This can only be achieved with the help of a policy mix of CO2 pricing and complementary regulatory instruments and measures.